Past Art Exhibits

Nunavut’s Culture on Cloth

April – May 2012

Brooks Hall, UVA –  Free and open to the public through May 21st

These unique Inuit art works were created by women in a tiny hamlet called Baker Lake. Using vibrant colors and patterns, they convey stories and can be a window into Inuit beliefs and traditions.  Witness people transforming into animals and other expressions of Arctic shamanism.  Look for timeless portraits of Inuit culture and wildlife.   Find joyful depictions of the TUNDRA, the huge wild Arctic biome loved by the Inuit.

From UVA, the collection will be moving to the Yukon Art Center in Whitehorse for the summer, and thereafter on tour at museums and universities throughout the Arctic circumpolar region. For more information about the exhibit, go to Culture On Cloth.

Historically, Inuit women scraped and chewed caribou and seal skins to soften them in the course of creating clothes for family, using sinew for thread.  They began applying their complex sewing skills to textiles in the 1960’s as external pressures confined their once nomadic lifestyle.  These textiles embellished with appliqué and colorful embroidery are a medium for Inuit women to continue a tradition of detailed art and handwork.

With a population of 1,500 people, Baker Lake is west of Hudson Bay, in Canada’s Nunavut, the huge indigenous region at the top of North America.  The Nunavut territory is the size of Western Europe and one of the most sparsely settled and remote regions of the world with a mainly Inuit population of approx. 30,000 which is only the size of UVA!

This exhibit is part of the Arctic Culture Forum Spring 2012 program.  From a gallery office on Elliewood that is open to the public, Arctic Culture Forum leads programs on Arctic life and culture for the UVA campus and Charlottesville community.

 

Inuit Prints of Cape Dorset

February-March 2012

Brooks Hall, UVA   

120310_jpg_VMFA_E0123008The Canadian Arctic.  Frozen seas, glacial mountains, endless empty miles of snow.  For thousands of years, the Inuit people, often called Eskimos, have lived in this region of North America, surviving under extraordinarily difficult conditions.

The prints in this exhibition show many aspects of Inuit culture; their legends, their routines of daily life, and their physical and spiritual bonds with the natural world.  The works display the distinctive form and character of one of the world’s last hunting societies.

Their prints tell us that the Inuit see and depict things in an ancient way:  the artists give us unusual views of their subject and are unconcerned with background or perspective.  Powerful animal and human forms stand out as isolated images, reflecting the way objects appear in the vast white expanses of the snow covered north.  Inuit art often refers to the spirit world and to the ancient religion of shamanism.  These colorful prints are vivid proof of Inuit artists’ strong ties to their land and heritage.

(excerpted from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts exhibition entitled “Inuit Images” loaned by Judith Varney Burch)

 

Nunavut’s Culture on Cloth

April- May 2012

Brooks Hall, UVA –  Free and open to the public through May 21st

These unique Inuit art works were created by women in a tiny hamlet called Baker Lake. Using vibrant colors and patterns, they convey stories and can be a window into Inuit beliefs and traditions.  Witness people transforming into animals and other expressions of Arctic shamanism.  Look for timeless portraits of Inuit culture and wildlife.   Find joyful depictions of the TUNDRA, the huge wild Arctic biome loved by the Inuit.

From UVA, the collection will be moving to the Yukon Art Center in Whitehorse for the summer, and thereafter on tour at museums and universities throughout the Arctic circumpolar region.

Historically, Inuit women scraped and chewed caribou and seal skins to soften them in the course of creating clothes for family, using sinew for thread.  They began applying their complex sewing skills to textiles in the 1960’s as external pressures confined their once nomadic lifestyle.  These textiles embellished with appliqué and colorful embroidery are a medium for Inuit women to continue a tradition of detailed art and handwork.

With a population of 1,500 people, Baker Lake is west of Hudson Bay, in Canada’s Nunavut, the huge indigenous region at the top of North America.  The Nunavut territory is the size of Western Europe and one of the most sparsely settled and remote regions of the world with a mainly Inuit population of approx. 30,000 which is only the size of UVA!

This exhibit is part of the Arctic Culture Forum Spring 2012 program.  From a gallery office on Elliewood that is open to the public, Arctic Culture Forum leads programs on Arctic life and culture for the UVA campus and Charlottesville community.